Lecture: The Great Flood of 1607

Date: 18th May 2019

Time: 2 - 4pm

Location: The Cartshed

Lecture: The Great Flood of 1607

Author, geographer and historian Mike Hall looks at the historical accounts and the surviving physical evidence for the Great Flood which swept up the South West coast and the River Severn in January 1607.

It left a trail of devastation in its wake on both sides of the river, with flood marks on some churches recording the event. But was it a storm surge or was it a tsunami? Come and hear Mike's conclusions to this fascinating tale.

 

Lecture: The Newport Medieval Ship

Date: 11th July 2019

Time: 7 -9pm

Location: The Cartshed

Lecture: The Newport Medieval Ship
In the summer of 2002, on the muddy banks of the River Usk, the remains of a 15th century Ship were found. Recovered, they now form a fascinating project to reveal the life and times of medieval Newport and her trading partners along the Atlantic seaboard.
The most complete 15th century European ship ever recovered, the importance to our maritime history cannot be overestimated as there is nothing else in the UK with which it can be compared. She was built 60 years before Henry VIII’s Mary Rose, possibly in the same Basque (northern Spain) shipyard as the vessels that 40 years later took Columbus across the Atlantic in 1492.
Join Rob Kenny of Friends of the Newport Ship to find out more about this magnificent and inspiring heritage icon. Learn about the conservation process, and about the wealth of evidence that this ship continues to yield about crew and cargoes, medieval life, times and trade.

Lecture: Building A Martian House

Date: 13th June 2019

Time: 7 - 9pm

Location: The Cartshed

Lecture: Building A Martian House

Over the past three years artists Ella & Nicki have been researching how to build an actual house that you could live in on Mars. Along the way they’ve been talking to scientists, engineers, architects and the general public to turn this into reality in a project called Building A Martian House.

Project collaborators include the award winning Hugh Broughton Architects, who designed the Halley VI British Antarctic Research Station. From the University Of Bristol Professor Lucy Berthoud who is a Spacecraft Systems Engineer and Dr Robert Myhill, a seismologist and mineral physicist, who is currently working on the NASA Insight Lander project.

The project explores what is possible to achieve through multi-disciplinary collaboration, and will ultimately create the house as a large scale public arts project - making something as ‘real as possible’ and on a fraction of the budget of NASA.

Join Ella and Nicki to find out what we will need to think about to live on another planet, and how you can get involved in the project.

Ella Good and Nicki Kent are artists based in Bristol. Their work looks to create conversations about how we live now and how we might live in the future.

Lecture: Pruning

Date: 25th April 2019

Time: 7 - 9pm

Location: The Cartshed

Lecture: Pruning

Pruning - an insight into the general principles, to get the most from our shrubs.

Pruning can cause some confusion amongst us gardeners; why, where, when and how should we prune? Understanding how a plant responds to our pruning cuts helps us to make good pruning decisions. This illustrated talk will cover the basic principles, help you avoid some common mistakes and hopefully clarify some confusions. With demonstrations of pruning techniques and a discussion of appropriate tools.

Speaker: Julie Henderson

Julie Henderson is an experienced professional gardener with a passion for pruning. Julie teaches workshops to adults and children at The University of Bristol Botanic Garden, and also on the RHS Level 3 Horticulture Certificate course. Her background includes working as a Horticultural Researcher for BBC Gardeners’ World and as a Tour Guide at Sir Harold Hillier Gardens.

Image: the Watlington Hoard, found in Oxfordshire

Lecture: The Vikings in our Past: Tracing and Classifying the Scandinavian Heritage of English Words

Date: 30th March 2019

Time: 2 - 4pm

Location: The Cartshed

Lecture: The Vikings in our Past: Tracing and Classifying the Scandinavian Heritage of English Words

The multiculturalism of today's Britain is a phenomenon that has recently been much spoken about for a number of reasons. However, very few people tend to think about the fact that the English language itself is equally multicultural, with thousands of words having been borrowed from other languages, particularly Latin, French and Old Norse (the language of the Vikings). Whereas many of the words borrowed from the first two languages can be easily recognised thanks to their form or very formal use (e.g. alumni, beaux, cuisine, etc.), that is not the case for the terms borrowed from Old Norse. They are so deeply integrated into the language that no one would suspect that they have not always been part of English (e.g. theyskullwindow, happy, ugly, cast, take, etc.). In this talk, we will explore the nature of the linguistic legacy that the Vikings left behind: the differences between Latin-, French- and Norse-derived words, what the latter can tell us about Viking-English relations and how best to identify and classify Norse loans in English.

Speaker: Dr Sara M. Pons-Sanz

Sara is a Senior Lecturer at Cardiff University. She specialises on the impact that Anglo-Scandinavian linguistic contacts had on the (medieval) English vocabulary, an field of research where she has authored a number of articles and monographs, including Norse-Derived Vocabulary in Late Old English Texts: Wulfstan’s Works, a Case Study (Odense, 2007) and The Lexical Effects of Anglo-Scandinavian Linguistic Contact on Old English (Turnhout, 2013). She is currently working on the 'Gersum Project: Scandinavian Influence on English Vocabulary' (www.gersum.org), and leads the Medieval English (ca600-1500) in a Multilingual Context academic network (https://memc1500.wordpress.com).

Cost: £5

Image: The Watlington Hoard, found in Oxfordshire

A thousand years of history: medieval cathedrals as time machines – Jon Cannon – Fully Booked

Date: 8th November 2018

Time: 7:00pm - 9:00pm

A thousand years of history: medieval cathedrals as time machines – Jon Cannon – Fully Booked

This lecture uses the English cathedrals as ‘time machines’ to the medieval period, tracing their story from the revolutionary birth of English Christianity in about 600AD, through the great rebuilding that followed the Conquest of 1066, to the decades around a century later when gothic was invented in an atmosphere of febrile change and political tension. It then follows the story through the cults and traumas of the fourteenth century, backdrop to England’s most extraordinary architectural miracles, and into the dynastic struggles of the late medieval era; struggles which eventually tore apart the very world that created the cathedrals. Throughout, beautiful photography of the buildings themselves, as well as of contemporary manuscripts and paintings, helps to use these buildings to bring to life the remarkable events they witnessed, and helping explain how these events shaped their architecture. The lecture will be tailored to work the specific story of Winterbourne and its connections with Bristol cathedral into the overall narrative.

 

Jon Cannon is established author and presenter of the critically acclaimed BBCTV documentary ‘How to Build a Cathedral’. His books include ‘Cathedral: the great English cathedrals and the world that made them’; ‘The Secret Language of Sacred Spaces’ and the Shire book of ‘Medieval Church Architecture’. His next book on the British Landscape is a work in progress.

As well as keeping busy with writing, Jon is a Research Associate of the History of Art department at the University of Bristol and a Lay Canon (Keeper of the Fabric) at Bristol Cathedral.

Jon travels widely and writes on a variety of other topics too. The article he wrote for the London Review of Books after travelling in N Korea long before the current ‘thaw’ in international relations was shortlisted for the David Watt Memorial Prize.

A New Roman Villa in South Gloucestershire – Neil Holbrook – Fully Booked

Date: 6th December 2018

Time: 7:00pm - 9:00pm

A New Roman Villa in South Gloucestershire – Neil Holbrook  – Fully Booked

The talk will discuss the recent excavation of a previously unsuspected Roman villa in the northern suburbs of Bristol. In addition to the exciting results of the dig itself, the talk will examine how the new site adds to our understanding of the Roman period as a whole in southern Gloucestershire.

Neil Holbrook is Chief Executive of Cotswold Archaeology, a national archaeological charity based in Cirencester. Neil is a specialist in the Roman period, and has been involved in numerous projects investigating sites of various periods over much of England and Wales. For the last 10 years he has been co-director of the Roman Rural Settlement Project with Prof Michael Fulford of Reading University, a transformational review of the Romano-British countryside